Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

Good Omens

By Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

  • Release Date: 2011-11-22
  • Genre: Fantasy
Score: 4.5
4.5
From 112 Ratings
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Description

Armageddon only happens once, you know. They don’t let you go around again until you get it right.”

According to the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch – the world’s only totally reliable guide to the future, written in 1655, before she exploded – the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just after tea…

People have been predicting the end of the world almost from its very beginning, so it’s only natural to be sceptical when a new date is set for Judgement Day. This time though, the armies of Good and Evil really do appear to be massing. The four Bikers of the Apocalypse are hitting the road. But both the angels and demons – well, one fast-living demon and a somewhat fussy angel – would quite like the Rapture not to happen.
And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist…

Reviews

  • Too much pratchett not enough giaman

    1
    By Finitegoose
    Waste of money and written in the same style as all the discworld novels so quite dull and the humour is weak.
  • Quite probably the best collaboration ever

    5
    By Severe Headcase
    This book is amazingly funny, which will have you in side splitting hysterics from start to finish!
  • John h

    5
    By Fulhamjon 9
    Always something of a risk when you recommend a book but not in this case. Superb, absolutely superb. Please, if you have not read this, put it right!
  • One of the best books in the world

    5
    By PJB¥
    Any one who remembers Jennings and Darbyshire and William Brown will recognise the world of this book but add fantasy and wonderful jokes. The first appearance of the hell hound is wonderful.
  • Get this book!

    5
    By Pulsifer
    You will all know the story... But it goes wrong. I love this book. The imagery invoked pulls you from celluloid to your own childhood and makes you smile whilst reading and just remembering afterwards or even when thinking about the Spanish Inquisition.

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