None Shall Divide Us by Michael Stone

None Shall Divide Us

By Michael Stone

  • Release Date: 2004-05-31
  • Genre: True Crime
Score: 4.5
4.5
From 34 Ratings
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Description

In 1988, the Loyalist hero, Michael Stone, was charged and sentenced to life for the murders of six men. He was released after 12 years, under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement in July 2000. This autobiography provides the true story of a freelance gun for hire.To Loyalists, Michael Stone is an idol and an icon. His name and face are painted on walls across Belfast. His desire to remove Adams and McGuinness from the political spectrum has turned him into a local super-hero. A meticulous killing machine, he executed six men, whose deaths were claimed under different Loyalist groupings, and when justice finally caught up with him he was sentenced to 800 years in prison. Twelve years later, he left a free man, renounced terrorism, apologised for the suffering he had caused and said the fledgling peace process was the only way forward. This is his own true story..

Reviews

  • Ok

    3
    By The single pens lame
    I bit contrary Stone tries (and fails) to portray himself as some guardian who operated a more ethical policy than everyone around him. There is no doubt that it is difficult to condemn his actions when I have not lived in Northern Ireland during the troubles but his mantra of never going for innocent victims sits uneasily with some of the statements he makes in this book. I have read many accounts of "the troubles" and Stone appears to be a bit player in most of them but in his own book portrays himself as an important player in both the loyalist movement and the prisoners movement. Having said this , at 99 pence for the book, you can't really go wrong.
  • Good read

    4
    By purple_haze_312
    Interesting insight into the troubles although obviously told from a biased point of view. If you're interested in Northern Irish history you can't go wrong with price at 99p

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